Medical Coding and Billing
DISCOVER THE CAREER OF MEDICAL CODING & BILLING


 
 
 

Medical coding is among the most in demand professions in the USA and around the world. If you ever had, and still have an interest in the industry of healthcare then the best time to get started is NOW.

   
Medical Coding and Billing Schools
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Medical Coder Salaries and Annual Pay

Size Matters! Not just the size of the office, but also the pay check is important.

The size of the business where the medical coder is employed affects their salary: those who work for larger employers tend to get paid more. Work schedules, complexity of the coding and geographical location also impact salary ranges. East coast regions often pay more than West coast regions and according to Reed Pew, CEO and President of AAPC, there is an 18 percent wage difference between non-certified coders and certified coders.

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work from home   Work Hours and Wages

The nature of this work can lend itself to alternative, or flexible working arrangements, such as part time work, full time work and work from home. The majority of employers, however, expect their medical billing and coding staff to work a standard 40-hour full-time week for which, in most cases, they are paid well. Freelancers often enjoy more flexibility when it comes to their hours, but many work even longer hours than a salaried employee. Needless to say, the more they work the more they stand to profit.

 

Industry Employment Percent of employment Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage
Offices of Physicians 41,450 1.79 $13.96 $29,030
General Medical and Surgical Hospitals 65,290 1.27 $17.80 $37,020
Outpatient Care Centers 6,740 1.14 $15.12 $31,440
Specialty (except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse) Hospitals 2,340 1.09 $18.88 $39,270
Nursing Care Facilities 13,260 0.80 $16.05 $33,380
* these figures are provided by the Department of Labor DOL) and are mean wages based on averages. Actual wages can be as much as $40,000 and more in states like Massachusetts.